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 Bishop John Robinson C of E Primary School

Bishop John Robinson C of E Primary School

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Pupil Premium


 

The Pupil Premium is an allocation of additional funding provided to schools to support specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement.  These include pupils who are entitled to free school meals, those looked after by the local authority and the children of armed service personnel.

All schools are required to report on the amount of funding received and how this is begin used.

Our Pupil Premium Strategy Docuement is available at the bottom of this page. In it can be found a summary of the main barriers to learning and a more detailed account of how the fund is being spent.

At BJRS we generally use the additional funding in the following ways:

  • Proportion of all support staff work to deliver evidence-based targeted interventions to small groups and individuals
  • Staff training in key areas to support and challenge PP pupils.
  • Dedicated teacher to support children with Special Educational Needs through withdrawal to  ‘Wisdom’ room
  • Additional Speech and Language Therapy (SALT) support for children and training for staff
  • Free or subsidised Breakfast Club and after school club places
  • Educational Psychologist time

  • Contribution towards the cost of residential and non-residential educational visits for targeted eligible pupils.

  • Free or subsidised half term block of  after school club places

  • Free or subsidised school uniform

  • Bespoke After School Maths club for PP and other disadvantaged children

 

2016/17 

The estimated Pupil Premium fund allocation for 2016/17 is £64, 680

We plan to allocate the fund in the following ways;

Activity

Intended Outcome

Dedicated teacher to support children with Special Educational Needs (25%) £7318

Improved outcomes children with SEN

Dedicated member of staff to have leadership responsibility for overseeing provision for Pupil Premium (50%) £1294

Efficient use of PP funding  - support for all disadvantaged children especially around improving writing

Free or subsidised Breakfast Club and after school club places £2000

To improve the rates of attendance. To ensure children have a healthy start to the day and to encourage healthy lifestyles.

In school targeted interventions for small groups enabled by the employment of additional staff and resources £11,395

Improved rates of progress and attainment in; Maths, Writing, Reading and Phonics

Subsidised residential trips £500

To ensure equal access and opportunities

Additional Speech and Language Therapy (SALT) support for children and training for staff (50%) £10,000

To support children with additional Speech and Language needs

To enable staff to better support children with additional speech and language needs

Increased Educational Psychologist (EP) time (50%) £1000

To support the identification of need and improve provision for children with additional needs

Free or subsidised school uniform £200

To reduce anxiety around the purchase of school uniform

 

Impact of Pupil Premium spend

Progress by the end of KS2

Reading

Writing

Maths

  • PP  -0.6
  • non PP -1.7
  • PP 1.2
  • non PP 0.6
  • PP -4.4
  • non PP -1.3
  • The Progress Gap is closing for PP in Reading and Writing as PP are making better progress than non-PP.
  • Although the gap needs to be narrowed further for maths, the children in reciept of Pupil Premium who did not make the required progress had additional support with maths but were unable to meet the expected standard

Attainment at the end of KS2 (SATs)

Subject

PP

Non PP

Gap

RBG Gap

RWM

56%

75%

-19%

-11%

Reading

78%

80%

-2%

-4%

Writing

78%

85%

-7%

-9%

Maths

56%

80%

-24%

-11%

GSP

56%

85%

-29%

-11%

  • Gap in reading and writing has narrowed to below RBG gap
  • Gap greatest in maths which explains low RWM combined average
  • This pattern is not reflected throughout the school with 73% PP working at expected in RWM compared with 67% non-PP
  • Throughout the school the gap is greatest in maths - 76% PP - 80% non-PP

In-year Attainment across the school Y1-6
(% at or above expected standard at the end of summer term 2017)

  Pupil Premium Non Pupil Premium Attainment Gap
Reading 82% (27 children) 77% (104 children) 5%
Writing 79% (26 children) 67% (96 children) 12%
Maths 76% (25 children) 78% (109 children) -2%
RWM 73% (24 children) 66% (92 children) 7%
  • As a group, children in reciept of the pupil premium achieve well compared to children who do not recieve this fund. 
  • Maths is the only area in which there is a small negative gap

In year progress (Y2-6)
Expected progress is 6 steps

% children making 6 steps or more progress

  Reading Writing Maths Average
Pupil Premium 83% 79% 79% 81%
Non-Pupil Premium 75% 76% 80% 77%
Gap 8% 3% -1% 4%
  • As a group, children in receipt of the Pupil Premium make good in-year progress compared with children who do not recieve this fund
  • Maths is the only area in which there is a small negative gap

What is the school doing about this?

School development plan priorities

  • Improve use of support staff in achieving outcomes for all children including disadvantaged
    • Quality 1st teaching with an emphasis on independent learning and differentiation
    • Data led interventions monitored by PP champion and SENDCo
  • Improve progress made by all pupils in Reading and Maths across the Key Stages to close to national standards
    • Targetted maths homework club
    • Improved use of resources to support teaching of maths
    • Monitoring including Pupil Progress meetings to focus on PP progress and attainment
  • Improve the effectiveness  of feedback pupils receive

Attendance 

Pupil Premium

Non-Pupil Premium

2015/16 

Summary Impact of Pupil Premium Funding

For the year 2015-2016 the school received £46, 200 pupil premium funding which was adjusted to £55,760 mid-year.

The fund was allocated in the following way

Activity

Intended outcome

Free or subsidised Breakfast Club and after school club places £2000

To improve the rates of attendance. To ensure children have a healthy start to the day and to encourage healthy lifestyles.

In school targeted interventions for small groups enabled by the employment of additional staff and resources £11,000

Improved rates of progress and attainment in; Maths, Writing, Reading and Phonics

Subsidised residential trips £500

To ensure equal access and opportunities

Additional Speech and Language Therapy (SALT) support for children £19,760

To support children with additional Speech and Language needs

Increased Educational Psychologist (EP) time £1,000

To support the identification of need and improve provision for children with additional needs

Free or subsidised school uniform £500

To reduce anxiety around the purchase of school uniform

PATHS Plus programme training for all staff £840

Enable staff to support social development of all children

Impact on Progress:

  • On average, children in receipt of pupil premium made more IN-YEAR progress than that of their peers
  • Progress is measured in STEPS with 6 steps being the 'expected' rate of progress within a year
  • The percentage of children making 6 or more steps progress (expected) and for 7 steps or more (greater than expected) is higher for children in receipt of the pupil premium than non-pupil premium

Progress*

Pupil Premium

Non-Pupil Premium

6 steps or more (expected)

92%

81%

7 steps or more

(more than expected)

57%

45%

*Average number of steps in Reading, Writing and Maths combined between Summer 2015 and Summer 2016 Source - Target Tracker Progress Breakdown

  • Progress between KS1 and KS2 shows a different picture than the in-year one

Subject

Pupil Premium*

Non-Pupil Premium

Difference

Reading progress

0.3

-1.4

1.1

Writing progress

-2.8

1.5

-4.2

Maths progress

-3.0

0.2

-3.2

*It is worth bearing in mind that of the 8 pupils identified in this data, 1 had a statement of special educational need and 3 joined the school mid-way through KS2 Source - RBG KS2 Data analysis

Attainment

  • Teacher assessments of children across the school show a higher proportion of Pupil Premium children working at or above expectation by the end of the year than non-pupil premium
 

Pupil Premium (8 pupils)

Non-Pupil Premium

Working at or above expectation in Reading, Writing and Maths*

72%

69%

*Source - Target Tracker Age Related Expectation Summary Report

KS2 Attainment

  • Only one Pupil Premium (non-SEN) child did not achieve the ‘expected’ scaled score of 100 in the Reading, Grammar and Maths SATs at the end of the year
  • Average scaled scores for PP were slightly higher than non-PP in reading and slightly lower in Maths and Grammar however the fact that the BJR PP average is above National for Reading and Grammar

Average scaled score

National Average*

Pupil Premium BJR**

Non-Pupil Premium BJR**

Reading

103

105

103

Maths

103

101

104

Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation (GSP)

104

104

106

*Source - NC assessments at KS2 in England (Interim) July 2016 
**Source - RBG KS2 Data analysis pack

  • PP children did less well with writing as only 63% (5 children) of PP children reached the required standard meaning 2 PP SEN

KS1 Attainment>

  • The proportion of Pupil Premium children working at or above expected was more than that of Non-Pupil premium in Reading, Writing and Maths combined.
  • The proportion of PP children working at or above in Reading was higher than non-PP, slightly lower in Maths and significantly lower in Writing

Working at or above expectation in

Pupil Premium (7 pupils)

Non-Pupil Premium

Reading, Writing and Maths combined

86%

71%

Reading

86%

71%

Writing

57%

71%

Maths

71%

76%

2014/15 

Summary Impact of Pupil Premium Funding

For the year 2014-2015 the school received £35, 200 pupil premium funding

Context

Although the school is in an area of High Deprivation (School Deprivation Indicator – National 0.24, BJR 0.33) the % pupils known to be eligible for Free School Meals  is lower than the National figure (National 26.0, BJR 21.3) A campaign was launched in 2015 to encourage ALL families to complete the PP forms to improve uptake.

Key Stage 1

The Attainment gap at Key Stage 1 between FSM and non FSM for all subjects was 3.0 Average Point Score (APS). This is nearly double that of the national figure.  This indicates that non-FSM children did far better than FSM at KS1. However, it is worth noting that one of the children had significant Special Educational needs and is now being educated at an alternative provision. One child was at L1 by the end of Y2 despite additional support. He has now left the school. Of the remaining children, only one achieved below 2B.

Key Stage 2

The Attainment gap at Key Stage 2 between FSM and non FSM for Reading, Writing and Maths had narrowed to 0.4 Average Point Score (APS).

The % of disadvantaged children making expected and more than expected progress in Mathematics, Reading and Writing in 2015 was higher than the National. Over all the ‘Value Added’ to our disadvantaged children was higher than that of other pupils in 2015 – Disadvantaged pupils 101.6, other pupils 101.3. 

The fund was allocated in the following way;

Activity

Measurable outcome

Free breakfast club place for all children who receive pupil premium - £10,000

To improve the rates of attendance for children receiving pupil premium from 96.1% last year to 99%

Books and Breakfast activity will form part of breakfast club where by children will have opportunities to read with breakfast club staff, our learning mentor and peer groups.

To improve progress and attainment in reading for children receiving pupil premium 

Free homework club for children receiving pupil premium led by our learning mentor -£5,000

Provide access to ICT for children to complete maths homework ensuring all pupil premium children have opportunities to complete homework to raise attainment and progress in maths.

In school targeted interventions for small groups enabled by the employment of additional staff and resources - £25,000

Improved rates of progress and attainment in;Maths, Writing, Reading and Phonics

Lunch time writing and maths club

Improved rates of progress and attainment in Maths and Writing

Additional Forest school sessions for younger children enabled by additional staff - £5,000

Improved spoken communication and social skills

Subsidised residential trips - £3,000

To ensure equal access and opportunities

2013/14 

For the academic year 2013/14 we received 40,500

A focus for this year was to raise achievement in Phonics.

Part of the fund was allocated to staff training and the setting up of phonics groups across KS1 and EYFS. As a direct result of this intervention our phonics outcomes improved significantly for all pupils (from 57% pass rate in Y1 in 2013 to 77% (above the National figure) in 2014.

Children retaking the phonics check also improved - 25% in 2013 to 80% pass rate in 2014.

By the end of Y2 90% of our children were working at the expected levels for phonics (this was 68% in 2013) 

Attainment for pupil premium children accross the school was largely good as the table shows. The gap in attainment between children recieving the pupil premium and those who do not was wide in Y6 last year. This is despite our best efforts to support these specific children through small group interventions. The gap was widest in Y5 last year (this year's Y6) and  we are addressing this issue this year by deploying staff to specifically support children in this class every morning. 

The in-year progress made by pupil premium children was largely similar (within 0.6 difference) to non-pupil premium in all but one class. We are confident that this year, those children will make accelarated progress though high quality first teaching and targetted interventions.

Pupil premium children in KS2 (Y3-6) on the whole made expected progress since the SATs tests in Y2. However, they did not make as much progress as non-pupil premium children, especially in Y5 (this year's Y6). We intend to address this by setting ambitious targets for these children and closely monitoring the progress they make.

4 of the 8 children who recieved the pupil premium in Y6 last year were also on the SEN register which has a bearing on our pupil premium outcomes. 50% of children receiving free school meals achieved Level 4 or higher this year in reading, writing and maths.  Most children who received free school meals made expected progress in reading and maths. However, the school is aware that the progress and attainment of the children receiving Free school meals was lower than that of their classmates although this has not been the case in previous years. As a result, the school is doing more this year to identify and support the specific needs of this group of children with increased use of smaller - focused groups for English, Maths and Phonics as well as targeted support from our Learning Mentor and out-of-school agencies such as the Speach and Language Team (SALT) and the Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) outreach team.

In addition to this, a portion of the fund is being spent on supporting behaviour in the playground and in class through special list coaching as well as a specific homework after school club and morning reading group specifically for children recieving pupil premium this year.

2012/13 

For the academic year 2012/13 we have received £27,000 in Pupil Premium Funding

2011/12 

For the academic year 2011/12, BJRS received £9890 in Pupil Premium funding.  The main outcomes of this additional funding were as follows:

  • 90% of the eligible pupils made good or better progress in English and Mathematics. 
  • 100% of the eligible pupils in Year 6 achieved Level 4 + in English and Mathematics, making good or better progress from Year 2. With 75% of them achieving at least a level 5 in either English or Mathematics and 12.5% of pupils achieving a level 6 in Mathematics.
  • A range of 'qualitative data' shows the specific skills and knowledge gains made by individual pupils through the extra support received.
  • Additional intervention support was also made available to a range of other underachieving or SEN pupils.